Find Apex Publications At GenCon 2018 This Weekend!

By Suyi Davies
on August 02, 2018

Find Apex Publications At GenCon 2018 This Weekend!

Welcome to GenCon Week! This year's 51st GenCon takes us on the road, from the Apex Publications offices in Lexington to the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis, where all the good stuff is happening this week.

Throughout the Best Four Days of Gaming(TM), Jason and Jane will be manning the Apex table at Hall J, Aisle 900, Table K (Hint: Hall J is just in off the Capitol Concourse). Come by and say hello, have a quick chat with Jason and Jane, who're willing to give you all the cool behind-the-scenes info you need about any Apex title.

On this battleground of wares, you're definitely spoiled for choice. You'll find all of Apex's best titles in print, from oldies-and-goodies like James Newman's Ugly as Sin and The Wicked to our War Stories anthology of military science fiction; from all-time-faves like Brian Keene's Throne of Bastards and The Lost Level to Benjaun Sriduangkaew's Winterglass; from all the Apex Books of World SF in one place to recent releases like Paul Jessup's Close Your Eyes, Kirk Jones' Aetherchrist, Jerry Gordon's Breaking The World and Damien Angelica Walters' Cry Your Way Home.

Jason at Panels and a wee Seminar

Publisher and Editor-In-Chief of Apex Publications, Jason Sizemore, will also be a panelist and seminar host through this period. His schedule includes:

- Thursday 2pm: Tighten and Clarify Your Writing (Seminar, Austin)
- Thursday 3pm: Writing for a Themed Anthology (Panel, Boston)
- Thursday 4pm: Writing Informative and Engaging Author Bios (Panel, Boston)
- Friday 11am: Revising Your Story (Panel, Boston)
- Friday 12pm: All About Apex (Panel, Ballroom 1)
- Saturday 10am: Editing (Panel, Boston)
- Saturday 11am: What Happens at a Publishing House (Panel, Ballrooms 3-4)
- Saturday 1pm: The Morphing of the Story (Panel, Boston)
- Saturday 3pm: Signing (Signing Table)
- Saturday 4pm: The Ins and Outs of Patreon (Panel, Boston)

If you're in Indianapolis, drop by (or if you've got your good Uncle Jesse up there, ask him to). Remember, hall hours are 10am to 6pm each day until Sunday, when it's 10am to 4pm.

See you guys at Table K!

Basic data about our work on The Apex Book of World SF series

By Jason Sizemore
on January 30, 2017

We first published The Apex Book of World SF: Volume 1 in November, 2009. That anthology and its subsequent volumes have been moderate successes for us. One volume or another are taught in numerous college courses (and at least one high school class). The third volume made the NPR's list of year's best books a few years ago.

Recently, we relaunched the series with a fantastic set of new covers by Sarah Anne Langton. Lavie Tidhar, the series' original editor, became "Series Editor" and Mahvesh Murad edited volume 4.

Much credit is due Lavie Tidhar. He's been a tireless supporter of international SF. The rising interest in non-English genre fiction is owed in part to Lavie's work.

Much credit is due the amazing authors and artists and translators who have contributed to the first four volumes. Thus far, we've published 86 international authors from 47 different countries.

47! Science fiction, fantasy, and horror are truly globla phenomenons!

Below is an embedded spreadsheet that we use as a reference for who we've published from which country.

Short Sales on Short Fiction - The Apex Book of World SF: Volume 1

By Lesley Conner
on May 06, 2016

We’re celebrating short fiction all month long with Short Sales on Short Fiction. Each sale gives you 48 hours to save 40% on either the print or eBook edition of the featured title!

Today’s featured book is The Apex Book of World SF: Volume 1 edited by Lavie Tidhar. Save 40% off the cover price today and tomorrow by using coupon code WSF40.

Synopsis:

 The Apex Book of World SF, edited by Lavie Tidhar, features award-winning science fiction and fantasy short stories from Asia, Eastern Europe and around the world.

The world of speculative fiction is expansive; it covers more than one country, one continent, one culture. Collected here are sixteen stories penned by authors from Thailand, the Philippines, China, Israel, Pakistan, Serbia, Croatia, Malaysia, and other countries across the globe. Each one tells a tale breathtakingly vast and varied, whether caught in the ghosts of the past or entangled in a postmodern age.

Among the spirits, technology, and deep recesses of the human mind, stories abound. Kites sail to the stars, technology transcends physics, and wheels cry out in the night. Memories come and go like fading echoes and a train carries its passengers through more than simple space and time. Dark and bright, beautiful and haunting, the stories herein represent speculative fiction from a sampling of the finest authors from around the world.

Don’t miss it! This is a great chance to save on fantastic short fiction! Use coupon code WSF40 at checkout to take advantage of this fantastic deal!

 

The Apex Book of World SF 4: Author Spotlight - Johann Thorsson

By Lesley Conner
on August 17, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Johann Thorsson is a native of Iceland who spent his youth in Israel and Croatia. He writes regular features about books for Bookriot.com and his short stories have been published in both English and Icelandic.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4.

I woke up with the image of a woman made of chocolate one morning, and she was eating herself (she was made of chocolate, after all). I couldn't get the image out of my head so I wrote a story but the woman being made out of chocolate didn't make any sense. So I tried it again with the woman being just a normal flesh-and-blood human. This both added to the story's versimilitude and made the self-cannibalism more of an anomaly. I re-wrote it again, and ended up with “First, Bite Just a Finger,” which sold to the first market I sent it to, Fireside Fiction.

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe?

Where to start? Reading stories about people who are unlike ourselves increases our empathy for them, decreases our myopic view of the world, and makes us better people overall. There is also a bias in publishing towards the works of white males (yes, I am aware of the irony) so anything we do to correct that bias is important.

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

There is a rather obvious answer to this for me, being from Iceland, but I'm going to recommend the magical and lyrical books of Jón Kalman Stefánsson. They tell stories that really couldn't take place anywhere but Iceland, and you feel the pain and successes of the characters while also seeing the harsh, unforgiving beauty of the country they live in.

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

Read our other The Apex Book of World SF 4 author spotlights

The Apex Book of World SF 4: Author Spotlight - Bernardo Fernández (Bef)

By Lesley Conner
on August 14, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Mexican author Bef has published three science fiction novels, as well as a series of crime novels. He has also published graphic novels. His short fiction has been published in Mexico City Noir, Three Messages, and Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories, and he is a winner of Spain’s Ingnotus Prize.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4.

It began as a heartbroken therapy. I'd just ended a long relationship and the writing of the story and its setting in an apocalyptic Mexico City worked as a metaphor of the pain I was feeling at the moment. It also was a sort of experiment: I tried to tell all the story from the first person point of view of a woman. The result is "The Last Hours of The Last Days." It was first published in SUB, a Mexican SF/F magazine, and its English translation was published by Rudy Rucker in his Flurb e-zine. English and Spanish versions have slightly different endings.

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe?

To get an idea of what the global zeitgeist is all about. SF is an especially interesting creative writing area. The global SF community has a lot of interesting stories to offer and this is a good opportunity to get a load of good reading from around the globe.

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

There are several names that come to my mind: Pepe Rojo, Alberto Chimal, Karen Chacek but if I had to choose only one, it'd be José Luis Zárate, maybe México's most bizarre fantasist, who's written several weird SF/F novels ranging from a Lovecraftian take on Lucha Libre (Xanto) to completing the Demeter's Captain diary from Dracula in La ruta del hielo y la sal. Zárate posts 4 daily micro stories on his twitter account: @joseluiszarate (alas, in Spanish). He´s my favourite living Mexican writer.

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

Read our other The Apex Book of World SF 4 author spotlights

The Apex Book of World SF: Author Spotlight - Rocío Rincón

By Lesley Conner
on August 10, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Rocío Rincón is a writer and reviewer who lives in Barcelona. Her work has been published in Timey Wimeys, The Best of Spanish Steampunk, Brujas: IV Antología de Relatos Fantásticos, and elsewhere.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4.

My story is set in a Catalan textile colony during the Industrial Revolution. The colonies were towns in everything but name and I have always been fascinated by how family, class, and workplace intersect. In my alternate history, there is a little more gender equality, Russia leads the scientific community, and colonies have established a bit of their own folklore.

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe?

Most genre fiction readers grow up with English literature and we adopt some tropes with the dangerous idea that some themes are universal.  It seems as if any intent of producing fiction from a non-English POV is a copy of/a reaction against English lit instead of a means of self-expression. Our own mythology, classics, and fantastic referents are sometimes regarded with a bit of shame and self-deprecation. This, combined with the comparatively lack of translation in the English publishing world, puts genre to an impasse. In reading authors from different countries, we challenge the feelings of inadequacy and broaden our perception of genre. It is a way to keep fiction fresh and nuanced. Also, as a translator, I am a bit biased when it comes to the publishing world and its impact on language. I think it is a bit of a global cultural responsibility to aid other publishing markets so they can also flourish and survive. Luckily, we can do so by reading, so it makes for a very fun responsibility to have.

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

We have very interesting and celebrated authors like Francisco Jota-Pérez, Ismael Biurrún, Pilar Pedraza, José Cotrina, or Aixa de la Cruz, to name a few. Unfortunately, many of them are not yet translated or not translated enough.

An author that is becoming more and more translated and whose career is interesting to follow is Sofía Rhei. She is a very talented writer and has tackled many formats (poetry, novels and short stories) and has a vast readership (she writes for children, YA, and for adults alike). In the last category, I really enjoy the stories in which she mixes sci-fi and linguistics in a poignant and critical manner.

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

Read our other The Apex Book of World SF 4 author spotlights

 

The Apex Book of World SF 4: Author Spotlight - Sabrina Huang

By Lesley Conner
on August 05, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Taiwanese author Sabrina Huang has published several short story collections under the pseudonym Jiu Jiu. Her work has won many Taiwanese short story competitions, including the China Times Literary Award and the United Daily Literary Award.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4.

“Setting Up Home” is a very short story -- so short that I can't really say what it's about without spoilers. Let's just say all is not what it seems.

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe?

There's a whole exciting world out there, why on earth would you want to limit yourself only to your tiny corner of it?

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

Rather than an author, I'm going to suggest that anyone interested should look up the Singaporean government's recent treatment of 16-year-old blogger Amos Yee - the whole episode tells you a lot about the country, and is quite as dystopian as any fiction I've come across. Bonus points for reading this alongside Ursula K. Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas."

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

Read our other The Apex Book of World SF 4 author spotlights

The Apex Book of World SF 4: Author Spotlight - Sathya Stone

By Lesley Conner
on August 03, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Sri Lankan author Sathya Stone’s stories have appeared in Strange Horizons and Every Day Fiction, among others.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4

Anyone who has written a graduate thesis will relate to this, I’m sure; after you’ve been at it for weeks, the subject matter, not matter how systematic and serious, starts to seem like utter, chaotic nonsense, and also you want to die. The whole period of time is a haze, but I think this story, “Jinki and the Paradox,” was my reaction to finishing my thesis, and then sort of reveling in the silly, whimsical side of maths and science. Hence the multiple references to Alice in Wonderland, my least favorite book when I was a child, because it drove me crazy and no one would explain why it was the way it was. Well, that and my English was terrible. 

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe? 

One of the books that had a huge impact on me when I was a kid was Sir Terry Pratchett’s The Dark Side of the Sun. It’s an amazing book, and one of the primary themes of the story, without giving away a huge spoiler, is the importance of looking at the same thing from different perspectives. Because no matter how deep you delve into your own thoughts and reflections, you’ve got biases and assumptions you will never notice without an outside influence pulling you up short, making you go, oh wait why didn’t I think of that, it's so obvious!

It would be exciting if we could get the perspective of alien races on the things we do and how we think, but since we haven’t got that option (yet?), we can try to listen to each other. And stories are the best and least violent way we have to get under someone else’s skin, someone who isn’t like you and doesn’t think like you, and can teach you a lot of things even if they don’t intend to.

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

I would recommend the late Nihal De Silva, particularly his novel The Road from Elephant Pass. While there are occasional problematic aspects to his work, for the most part, he will unflinchingly address the flaws in my country’s mixed-up culture, our hypocrisies and foolishness and inequalities. But he won’t forget the good stuff, all the things that make Sri Lanka interesting and beautiful and a place I’m extraordinarily happy to belong to. Mr. De Silva perfectly captures the way we sort of muddle along the best we can, always full of optimism in the face of just about anything.

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

Read our other The Apex Book of World SF 4 author spotlights

The Apex Book of World SF 4: Author Spotlight - Vajra Chandrasekera

By Lesley Conner
on July 31, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Vajra Chandrasekera lives in Colombo, Sri Lanka, and his short stories have appeared in Clarkesworld, Lightspeed, and Black Static, among others.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4.

"Pockets Full of Stones" was my first published story. It's a first-contact story, which seems in hindsight like a very suitable opening gambit to the game of zines. Stanislav Petrov was in the news a lot while I was writing it (they were gearing up to give him another award, I think) and you can see that in the story quite clearly; Dike, like Petrov, unexpectedly finds herself with a world-altering decision in her hands.

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe? 

I like to think that any reader's natural instinct is to read widely, to explore and discover new worlds and new minds, because at the root that's why people read fiction in the first place. So to subvert this instinct, to not read stories from around the globe, is a political act. Obviously you should not read fiction that doesn't interest you, but if you don't even give yourself the opportunity to become intrigued, then you're reading narrowly by choice. Which seems like such a masochistic practice, and not in the fun way. 

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

It would definitely be Sivamohan Sumathy, particularly her 2008 book like myth and mother, a small collection of poetry and prose. People give Stanislav Petrov awards because of the big war that didn't start in 1983, but that was also the year that the Sri Lankan civil war started. A small war by comparison, but wars are always bigger on the inside than they are on the outside. Sumathy's book is a map to that inside, if you like: not the merely informational kind of map that a tourist might find useful, but the kind that's also a territory in its own right. I highly recommend it, and I think there's a good chance we'll be seeing an ebook version in the near future, so do keep an eye out for that.

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

The Apex Book of World SF 4: Author Spotlight - Dilman Dila

By Lesley Conner
on July 30, 2015

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mahvesh Murad is coming in late August. Between now and then, we would like to feature some of the contributors in the anthology.

Dilman Dila is a writer and filmmaker from Uganda, whose work has won the BBC Radio Playwriting Competition, the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, Short Story Day Africa prize, the Million Writers Awards, and the Jalada Prize for Literature. His The Felistas Fable was nominated for Best First Feature at AMAA 2014, and won four major awards at the Uganda Film Festival 2014.

Preorder The Apex Book of World SF 4.

Preorder all four anthologies in The Apex Book of World SF series with their brand new covers.

Tell us a little about your story in The Apex Book of World SF 4.

“How My Father Became a God” is a scifi tale set in an African nation long before colonialism. It features a little girl whose brothers are eager to sell her off into marriage so they can earn cattle to find wives for themselves. She has to rely on her father, an inventor, to fight them off. I had a lot of fun writing this story, and I’m thinking of expanding into a novel about the adventures of this little girl with the scientific inventions of her father. What appeals to me about it is the range of possibilities it offers to explore Africa before the Europeans came. We have been brainwashed to believe that sub-Sarahan Africa did not have any technological capacity, nor any scientific ambitions, yet when I look at traditional medicine, when I learn that healers in Bunyoro had perfected the art of caesarean operation long before European doctors had thought of it, when I look at weapons like the shongo knife, I wonder how such communities could not have mastered any technology. They had science, I believe, though it was mixed with religion, but it was a branch of science and it’s sad that much of this has been lost to history. Some stories in my book, A Killing in the Sun, explore this theme, of a science different from what we know as science, and how the world might change if this alternate science is the dominant means of providing our world with technology. Would we have pollution and climate change, and would we be playing God to such disastrous effects?

Why do you feel it is important to read stories from around the globe?

The world is now a global village, but it is dominated by perspectives of one group of people. The stories that are consumed, the films that are made, the products, are all from one kind of culture, but people in other cultures are beginning to question this state of affairs, why they have to consume stories that have heroes and heroines from only one part of the world. It’s not just to diversify for the sake of it, it’s not even to diversify to increase market shares of a product and hence profits. Reading widely improves your appreciation of cultures that are not your own. The biggest problems in the world today, like racism, xenophobia, terrorism, and criminalizing immigration, come from a lack of understanding of other cultures, from a lack of respect of people who are not like you. To summarize it in a single sentence, reading from other cultures enhances peace and love and equality amongst humans.

If you could tell people to read one author from your home country, who would it be and why?

This is a difficult one, since I know several who are good to read, and who have been recognized in international prizes, but I will point out Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, mostly because her book, Kintu, a historical novel set in Buganda before the Europeans came, has elements of SFF. She is not a specfic writer and I think I would have enjoyed it better if she had treated it as a fantasy, but it’s still a very good read. It unfolds as though it is an oral story, grips you from the first pages and takes you to a world you think you know, but that you find fresh and exciting.

Preorder your copy of The Apex Book of World SF 4 today!

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