Posts made in July, 2009

Writing Advice: Networking

Posted by on Jul 13, 2009 in Apex Publications Blog: Matters of SF, Fantasy, and Horror | 0 comments

By Maurice Broaddus When I talk to some newbie writers about networking, they seem to hear it as butt-kissing or something they shouldn’t have to do in order to get published. They want no part of the politics of writing/publishing. Typically I hear this from the self-published crowd who tend to show little interest in the business aspect of writing. (Ironic since if you are going to go the self-publishing route, you should know the business side of things even better). So this isn’t for them. One of the reasons we go to conventions is to network. It’s why we spend so much time on message boards, blogs, and social networking sites. While publishing largely boils down to...

Read More

Interview: J.M. McDermott, author of LAST DRAGON

Posted by on Jul 7, 2009 in Apex Publications Blog: Matters of SF, Fantasy, and Horror | 0 comments

J.M. McDermott published his first novel, Last Dragon, in January, 2008 under the Wizards of the Coast Discoveries program. Last Dragon drew immediate praise from both fans and critics for its stylistic prose and unconventional narrative structure. The book went on to make the ‘Editors Choice’ top ten at Amazon.com. Apex Publications published the eBook versions of Last Dragon in June, 2009 (available via Amazon, B&N, and the iBookstore). The print version of the book is available via Amazon, B&N, and other online venues. Prior to the publication of Last Dragon, McDermott was a prolific short fiction and poetry writer. His work has appeared in Fantasy Magazine,...

Read More

Writing Advice: Our Bi-Directional Assumption of Trust

Posted by on Jul 7, 2009 in Apex Publications Blog: Matters of SF, Fantasy, and Horror | 0 comments

By Maurice Broaddus When a publisher of any repute buys a book from you, it’s a bi-directional assumption of trust. The author trusts that the publisher will do their best to edit, publish, and market your title. The publisher trusts that the author will do their very best to see that their book is a success by taking it on themselves to do a respectable amount of self-promotion. We tend to forget that when we get published, we writers join with our presumptive publishers in a peculiar relationship, this “bi-directional assumption of trust”. There are certain things I want the publisher to do for me, the things I might not necessarily be capable of doing for myself (or...

Read More